ithemba life
iThemba Life

OBINNA EZUGWU

Roche Diagnostics (Pty) Ltd, has announced the introduction of iThemba Life mobile health application solution in Nigeria.

iThemba Life empowers patients to receive their diagnostic test results directly on their smartphones, a critical need in low- to middle-income countries with infrastructure limitations, a statement from the firm said on Monday.

According to the statement, the mobile solution, which currently provides support to HIV programs, is available to Ministries of Health or other healthcare organizations that are willing to partner with Roche Diagnostics (Pty) Ltd to implement it on a regional or country basis.

The firm explained that through a simple user interface, people living with HIV (PLHIV) receive test results and are encouraged to maintain appointments, receive recommendations to improve their disease management in accordance with country guidelines and have access to tailored education content.

iThemba Life, it said, also allows clinics to easily identify patients eligible for differentiated service delivery (DSD) programs for simplified access to treatments.

“Roche is committed to putting patients at the forefront. With iThemba Life, people are empowered to play a more active role in their health, with easy access to result information, no matter their location, coupled with continuous disease educational elements,” said Sandra Orta, Corporate General Manager South Africa & Head of Management Center Sub-Saharan Africa, Roche Diagnostic. “The use of mobile application for direct result delivery significantly improves our capabilities, providing patients tools for personalised disease management while improving clinic efficiency.”

In his own remark, Prof Francois Venter, Divisional Director at Ezintsha in Prince of Wales Terrace Parktown, said, “Remaining adherent to HIV treatment and care are crucial to achieving and maintain viral suppression. iThemba Life makes it possible for PLHIV to remain engaged in care, receive timeous HIV viral load results, and act timeously. If implemented correctly, this innovation offers the potential to improve HIV viral suppression rates in South Africa.”