Former FIFA Executive Committee member, Amos Adamu has declared that the ban placed on key members of the organization including Sepp Blatter, its president, and Michel Platini, the UEFA President is the prize the top executives have to pay declaring that they are caught up in their own game.
“It’s a game they are playing and it has caught up with them and I’m not in any way surprised, he said, in reaction to the development.
Both men, regarded as the most powerful men in football with former France captain Platini regarded as Blatter’s heir apparent were alongside Secretary General Jerome Valcke were handed a 90-day suspension by the ethical body on Thursday on corruption charges. South Korean Chung Mong-Jung was also banned for six years.
Adamu, who was banned by the body in 2010 after corruption charges, said he is not surprised by the ongoing development in FIFA, who he said needs fresh faces in order to wash off its dirty perception in the wake of the unending corruption charges against the bulk of its top executives particularly this year.
Blatter, Platini and Valcke could all have their ban extended by a further 45 days which would see them having no hand in the presidential election scheduled for Feb 26, 2016.
Meanwhile, the FIFA ethics committee has dismissed allegations from Blatter’s lawyers that the president of the ruling body got no appropriate hearing ahead of his provisional 90-day ban.
“Mr Blatter was questioned on October 1 by Robert Torres from the FIFA ethics committee. Mr Blatter had the right to comment in detail on all open questions,” Andreas Bantel, spokesman of the ethics committee investigatory chamber, told dpa.
In appealing Thursday’s ruling, according to the New York Times, Blatter’s legal team said that Blatter was not heard properly, that the ethics committee decision was solely based on a Swiss criminal probe and complained that Blatter only learnt of the ban when it was published by the ethics committee.
Platini said Thursday he would appeal the ruling, and like Blatter he protested his innocence.